Bomb

The Race to Build - and Steal - the World's Most Dangerous Weapon

By Sheinkin, Steve

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ISBN
978-1-59643-487-5 978-1-59643-861-3
Publisher
Roaring Brook/Flash Point


REVIEWS

School Library Journal

Starred Review on October 1, 2012  |  Nonfiction

Gr 5 Up–“Harry Gold was right: This is a big story.” So begins this depiction of the “creation–and theft–of the deadliest weapon ever invented.” As he did in The Notorious Benedict Arnold (Roaring Brook, 2010), Sheinkin has again brought his superior talent for storytelling to bear in what is truly a gripping account of discovery, espionage, and revolutionary changes in both physics and the modern world. This fascinating tale, packed with a wide cast ...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

Horn Book Magazine

Reviewed on September 1, 2012

While comprehensive in his synthesis of the political, historical, and scientific aspects of the creation of the first nuclear weapon, Sheinkin focuses his account with an extremely alluring angle: the spies. The book opens in 1950 with the confession of Harry Gold -- but to what? And thus we flash back to Robert Oppenheimer in the dark 1930s, as he and readers are handed another question by the author: “But how was a theoretical physicist supposed to save the world?” Oppenheimer’s realizatio...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

Horn Book Guide

Reviewed on January 1, 2012

While comprehensive in its synthesis of the political, historical, and scientific aspects of the creation of the first nuclear weapon, this ...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

Junior Library Guild

Reviewed on October 1, 2012

Incisive and exciting, Steve Sheinkin’s stellar history has the pacing of a thriller. A riveting prologue, set in 1950, plunges readers into the story as FBI agents corner Harry Gold, a spy for the Soviets and a central figure in the book. Individuals, including Norwegian resistance fighters, scientists, pilots, survivors of the bombing of Hiroshima, and world leaders are fleshed out with vivid descriptions. For example, Robert Oppenheimer, a skinny, chain-smoking professor who later became technical director of the Manhattan Project, is introduced with a memorable anecdote about how he once left a date in his car at the Golden Gate Bridge to take a walk and end...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

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